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Vale Janet Hawtin Reid

Janet Hawtin ReidJanet Hawtin Reid (@lucychili) sadly passed away last week.

A mutual friend called me a earlier in the week to tell me, for which I’m very grateful.  We both appreciate that BlueHackers doesn’t ever want to be a news channel, so I waited writing about it here until other friends, just like me, would have also had a chance to hear via more direct and personal channels. I think that’s the way these things should flow.

knitted Moomin troll by Janet Hawtin ReidI knew Janet as a thoughtful person, with strong opinions particularly on openness and inclusion.  And as an artist and generally creative individual,  a lover of nature.  In recent years I’ve also seen her produce the most awesome knitted Moomins.

Short diversion as I have an extra connection with the Moomin stories by Tove Jansson: they have a character called My, after whom Monty Widenius’ eldest daughter is named, which in turn is how MySQL got named.  I used to work for MySQL AB, and I’ve known that My since she was a little smurf (she’s an adult now).

I’m not sure exactly when I met Janet, but it must have been around 2004 when I first visited Adelaide for Linux.conf.au.  It was then also that Open Source Industry Australia (OSIA) was founded, for which Janet designed the logo.  She may well have been present at the founding meeting in Adelaide’s CBD, too.  OSIA logo - by Janet Hawtin ReidAnyhow, Janet offered to do the logo in a conversation with David Lloyd, and things progressed from there. On the OSIA logo design, Janet wrote:

I’ve used a star as the current one does [an earlier doodle incorporated the Southern Cross]. The 7 points for 7 states [counting NT as a state]. The feet are half facing in for collaboration and half facing out for being expansive and progressive.

You may not have realised this as the feet are quite stylised, but you’ll definitely have noticed the pattern-of-7, and the logo as a whole works really well. It’s a good looking and distinctive logo that has lasted almost a decade and a half now.

Linux Australia logo - by Janet Hawtin ReidAs Linux Australia’s president Kathy Reid wrote, Janet also helped design the ‘penguin feet’ logo that you see on Linux.org.au.  Just reading the above (which I just retrieved from a 2004 email thread) there does seem to be a bit of a feet-pattern there… of course the explicit penguin feet belong with the Linux penguin.

So, Linux Australia and OSIA actually share aspects of their identity (feet with a purpose), through their respective logo designs by Janet!  Mind you, I only realised all this when looking through old stuff while writing this post, as the logos were done at different times and only a handful of people have ever read the rationale behind the OSIA logo until now.  I think it’s cool, and a fabulous visual legacy.

Fir tree in clay, by Janet Hawtin Reid
Fir tree in clay, by Janet Hawtin Reid. Done in “EcoClay”, brought back to Adelaide from OSDC 2010 (Melbourne) by Kim Hawtin, Janet’s partner.

Which brings me to a related issue that’s close to my heart, and I’ve written and spoken about this before.  We’re losing too many people in our community – where, in case you were wondering, too many is defined as >0.  Just like in a conversation on the road toll, any number greater than zero has to be regarded as unacceptable. Zero must be the target, as every individual life is important.

There are many possible analogies with trees as depicted in the above artwork, including the fact that we’re all best enabled to grow further.

Please connect with the people around you.  Remember that connecting does not necessarily mean talking per-se, as sometimes people just need to not talk, too.  Connecting, just like the phrase “I see you” from Avatar, is about being thoughtful and aware of other people.  It can just be a simple hello passing by (I say hi to “strangers” on my walks), a short email or phone call, a hug, or even just quietly being present in the same room.

We all know that you can just be in the same room as someone, without explicitly interacting, and yet feel either connected or disconnected.  That’s what I’m talking about.  Aim to be connected, in that real, non-electronic, meaning of the word.

If you or someone you know needs help or talk right now, please call 1300 659 467 (in Australia – they can call you back, and you can also use the service online).  There are many more resources and links on the BlueHackers.org website.  Take care.

Post-work: the radical idea of a world without jobs | The Guardian

Creative kid’s piano + vocal composition

An inspirational song from an Australian youngster.  He explains his background at the start.

Mental Health Resources for New Dads

Right now, one in seven new fathers experiences high levels of psychological distress and as many as one in ten experience depression or anxiety. Often distressed fathers remain unidentified and unsupported due to both a reluctance to seek help for themselves and low levels of community understanding that the transition to parenthood is a difficult period for fathers, as well as mothers.

The project is hoping to both increase understanding of stress and distress in new fathers and encourage new fathers to take action to manage their mental health.

This work is being informed by research commissioned by beyondblue into men’s experiences of psychological distress in the perinatal period.

Informed by the findings of the Healthy Dads research, three projects are underway to provide men with the knowledge, tools and support to stay resilient during the transition to fatherhood.

https://www.medicalert.org.au/news-and-resources/becoming-a-healthy-dad

Busyness: A Modern Health Crisis | LinkedIn

Benjamin Cardullo writes about an issue that we really have to take (more) seriously.  Particularly with mobile devices enabling us to be “connected” 24/7, being busy (or available) all of that time is not a good thing at all.

How do we measure professional success? Is it by the location of our office or the size of our paycheck? Is it measured by the dimensions of our home or the speed of our car? Ten years ago, those would have been the most prominent answers; however, today when someone is really pulling out the big guns, when they really want to show you how important they are, they’ll tell you all about their busy day and how they never had a moment to themselves.

Read the full article: https://www.linkedin.com/pulse/busyness-modern-health-crisis-benjamin-cardullo

Explainer: what’s the link between insomnia and mental illness?

OSMI Mental Health in Tech Survey 2016

World Mental Health Day 2015

On this year’s World Mental Health Day, some info from Lifeline and Mental Health Australia:

Mental Health Begins with Me

Did you know 70% of people with mental health issues don’t seek help? […] As a community we can encourage others to take care of their mental health by breaking down the barriers that stop people seeking help when they need it.

How can you help?

Make your mental health promise and share it today.  Encourage your friends and family to do the same and share their promises here or on social media using the hashtag #WMHD2015.

Here are some great tips and promises to make to yourself this 10/10 (October 10th):

  1. Sleep well
  2. Enjoy healthy food
  3. Plan and prioritize your day
  4. Tune into the music you love
  5. Cut down on bad food and booze
  6. Switch off your devices and tune out
  7. Hangout with people who make you feel good
  8. Join in, participate and connect
  9. Exercise your body and mind
  10. Seek advise and support when you need it

 

Suicide doesn’t take away the pain, it gives it to someone else

"Suicide doesn't take away the pain, it gives it to someone else"This is something that I feel quite strongly about. Both of my parents have tried to commit suicide when I was young, at different times and stages of my life. The first one was when I was about 11 and I don’t remember too much about it, there was a lot of pain flying around the family at that time and I was probably shielded from the details. The second parent (by then long divorced from the other parent) tried when I was 21 and away at uni in a different city. That one I remember vividly, even though I wasn’t there.

My reactions to the second were still those of a child. Perhaps when it’s a parent, one’s reactions are always those of a child. For me the most devastating thought was a purely selfish one (as fits a child) “Do I mean that little to them? Am I not even worth staying alive for?” The pain of that thought was overwhelming.

At the time I was young, saw myself as an optimist and simply could not relate in any way to the amount of pain that would bring one to such an action. I was angry. I described suicide as “the most selfish act anyone could do”.

Now decades of time and a world of life experience later, I have stared into that dark abyss myself and I know the pain that leads one there. I know how all-encompassing the pain and darkness seems and how the needs of others fade. An end to the pain is all one wants and it seems inconceivable that one’s life has any relevance any more. In fact, one can even argue to oneself that others would be better off without one there.

In those dark times it was the certain knowledge of that pain I had experienced myself as one (almost) left behind that kept me from that road more firmly than anything else. By then I was a parent myself and there was just no way I was going to send my children the message that they meant so little to me they were not even worth living for.  Although living seemed to be the hardest thing I could do, there was no hesitation that they were worth it.

And beyond the children there are always others. Others who will be affected by a suicide, no matter of whom. None of us is truly alone. We all have parents, we may have siblings. Even if all our family is gone and we feel we have no friends, it is likely that there are people who care. The person at the corner shop from whom you buy milk on weekends and who may think “should I have known? Is there anything I could have done?” Even if you can argue that there is no-one that would notice or care, let’s be frank, someone is going to have to deal with the body and winding up of financial and other affairs. And I’m sure it’s really going to make their day!

Whenever I hear about trains being delayed because of incidents on the track I am immediately concerned for those on the train, not least of all the drivers. What have they ever done to that person to deserve the images that will now be impossible to erase from memory, which will haunt their nights and dark moments and which may lead them to require therapy.

There are many people, working for many organisations, some sitting at telephones in shifts 24 hrs a day, who want more than anything else to help people wrestling with these dark issues. They care. They really do. About everyone.

Help is always available. So let’s all acknowledge that suicide Always causes pain to others.


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